Do we need comps like WBBC and Elite 8 Invitational?

Prabhzy

Active Member
Messages
201
#1
Ever since the WBBC and Elite 8 stopped happening after 2015, I have always wondered whether we are missing out on a platform where the worlds best teams go head to head to win the coveted title?

JVD won WBBC in 2015 and BBC in 2016, while Ankhile also placed in 2015. Aussie teams have made their mark in Bruin within the last few years but i think we need a comp like this which happens every 2 years atleast if not yearly.

Can you imagine the hype and rivalries for a lineup with teams such as,

-NJ
-SPD
-GCC
-AJ
-AEG
-FCB
-BASS
-Furteley Shokeen etc

Discuss
 

KarnSingh

Active Member
Messages
352
#2
These comps did a great job hosting the best teams at the time. However, the best teams of the night rarely (or even the season) won. IMO this actually led to the "decline" of competitive bhangra. When a deserving team doesn't place, at these "prestigious" competitions, no one wants to compete anymore. No one sees the point of working hard to build these amazing sets with amazing dancers, just to lose to a wildcard team.
 

Basim

♥ BTF ♥
Staff member
Messages
1,349
#3
I would love to see more international level competitions because I just feel it takes a whole lot to bring teams together from all over the world.

As @KarnSingh pointed out, often times, the expected or a "deserving" team (frankly being invited to one of these competitions should be a big deal for any team, but that's besides the point) doesn't always place. Despite that, I feel that the hype that these sorts of competitions bring to the circuit is a great motivator.. especially if teams know that they have a chance to be invited beforehand, they may work extra hard to bring crisp/clean set and incorporate some super creativity to distinguish themselves from other teams during the regular season.

~ Basim :)
 
Messages
22
#4
It's time the World came to the UK. Even some of the non-placing teams at Bhangra Fest this year could give some of the US/AUS teams a run for their money. Generally, it's not feasible for a UK team to fly out and compete. We have ONE Elite Pro competition a year here and have to pool all resources for that (which tends to produce incredible sets like GCC @ TBC14, AJ @ TBC16, GCC @ BF17 & GCC @ BF18). I can't speak for every one, but it's fair to assume majority of the UK teams would much rather work hard to bring the best and compete against the best at Bhangra Fest than fly out to a comp in a different country and miss out on BF. A UK team winning a comp in a diff country holds no value in the UK scene. JVD winning sets at WBBC/BBC would not have won in the UK competing against the likes of GCC/Vasda Punjab/AJ.
 

lalfuture

New Member
Messages
29
#5
There needs to be more financial support for a UK event like to happen, Mr. Singh. Especially with teams in the US, basic financial support can only run in the hundreds.

I think Bhangra, in general, needs to be marketed a lot better, and then you will see comps like what your proposing happen. Personally, the level of dance and competition in Bhangra is amazing today to see, but it would be great if the marketing was better.
 

Prabhzy

Active Member
Messages
201
#6
It's time the World came to the UK. Even some of the non-placing teams at Bhangra Fest this year could give some of the US/AUS teams a run for their money. Generally, it's not feasible for a UK team to fly out and compete. We have ONE Elite Pro competition a year here and have to pool all resources for that (which tends to produce incredible sets like GCC @ TBC14, AJ @ TBC16, GCC @ BF17 & GCC @ BF18). I can't speak for every one, but it's fair to assume majority of the UK teams would much rather work hard to bring the best and compete against the best at Bhangra Fest than fly out to a comp in a different country and miss out on BF. A UK team winning a comp in a diff country holds no value in the UK scene. JVD winning sets at WBBC/BBC would not have won in the UK competing against the likes of GCC/Vasda Punjab/AJ.
I would have echoed your sentiments as Ive always wanted to see international teams come to the UK ( and believe me from the chatter ive heard in the last 2/3 years that US/Aus teams are interested in competing here). However when there is only ONE comp in the UK a year and now this year we had 10 teams competing, do you think the organising committee for Bhangra Fest will turn around to local teams and say sorry you cant compete this year as we want to invite 2/3 international teams? Hence a barrier is created for international teams to apply. I have always thought the UK should have another comp and this doesn't mean that the quality of UK sets will reduce just because we have more than one opportunity to compete in a year?

Also your point about JVD is pure hypothetical? Vasda Punjab in 2013/2014 were no where at the level they are now and they improved. Im pretty sure if JVD still existed they would be on the same level ( presuming they attracted the same level of dancers)
 
Messages
22
#7
Who said anything about invitation? I never said UK organisers will say no to local teams to invite overseas team. The current comp is based on audition tapes, if a UK local team doesn't make the cut and an overseas team does, it's then fair isn't it.

There's only less than a handful of teams in the US/NA circuit that can go toe-to-toe with some of the UK Elite teams. Everyone watches TBS and BF sets more than sets coming out of the US/AUS scene. UK Mixers are mixing for overseas team. The elephant in the room is that the Elite scene of NA/US during the 2009-2012 days is no more and the best has been coming out of the UK since 2014. There's no attraction to go to the US and compete anymore.

And there's no barrier, there's nothing stopping an overseas team showing interest in Bhangra Fest. Maybe they have before but didn't make the cut? We don't know. In Bhangra Wars 2015, a team came over and I rate them because they made the jump to come here the same way GCC,AJ,JVD,APPD etc made to go to the US (whether via invitation or application).

You need to realise that I, alongside a lot of other people in the UK are still active in the scene, unlike yourself. You're more active on BTF than in the UK Bhangra Scene. It's all good coming on BTF and giving your subjective thoughts based on no facts but what happens within the scene is very different to what it may seem to you. It shows how ill-informed you are about the UK scene when you make blanket statements like "Im pretty sure if JVD still existed they would be on the same level". UK Bhangra has evolved and improved year on year and if you think that style of set would last going up against the Elite of today, you're showing your basic knowledge of Bhangra and the UK scene. Coming on BTF and creating all these threads and making all these statements is giving the members of BTF a false representation of what the UK scene is.

P.S - How Soormay are not on this list is criminal

"Can you imagine the hype and rivalries for a lineup with teams such as,

-NJ
-SPD
-GCC
-AJ
-AEG
-FCB
-BASS
-Furteley Shokeen etc"
 

siddyp

Tough times never last, but tough people do.
Messages
1,237
#8
We've been interested in coming to the UK. We spoke to some folks who have tried to apply. The sentiment has always been that the organizers won't take a US team over a UK team because of ticket sales. A local team will sell a lot of tix, versus a US team selling 0. Even spoke to Harjot about it too. He has expressed interest in coming to record. They won't bring him over because they can't monetize on his videos.

It has been a few years since these conversations, and maybe there has been turnover and new organizers may think differently now. But thats a reason why we and some others have made basically no effort to come. But trust. We'd love to come dance on those stages. TBC/Bhangra fest look RIDICULOUS.
 

Prabhzy

Active Member
Messages
201
#9
Who said anything about invitation? I never said UK organisers will say no to local teams to invite overseas team. The current comp is based on audition tapes, if a UK local team doesn't make the cut and an overseas team does, it's then fair isn't it.

There's only less than a handful of teams in the US/NA circuit that can go toe-to-toe with some of the UK Elite teams. Everyone watches TBS and BF sets more than sets coming out of the US/AUS scene. UK Mixers are mixing for overseas team. The elephant in the room is that the Elite scene of NA/US during the 2009-2012 days is no more and the best has been coming out of the UK since 2014. There's no attraction to go to the US and compete anymore.

And there's no barrier, there's nothing stopping an overseas team showing interest in Bhangra Fest. Maybe they have before but didn't make the cut? We don't know. In Bhangra Wars 2015, a team came over and I rate them because they made the jump to come here the same way GCC,AJ,JVD,APPD etc made to go to the US (whether via invitation or application).

You need to realise that I, alongside a lot of other people in the UK are still active in the scene, unlike yourself. You're more active on BTF than in the UK Bhangra Scene. It's all good coming on BTF and giving your subjective thoughts based on no facts but what happens within the scene is very different to what it may seem to you. It shows how ill-informed you are about the UK scene when you make blanket statements like "Im pretty sure if JVD still existed they would be on the same level". UK Bhangra has evolved and improved year on year and if you think that style of set would last going up against the Elite of today, you're showing your basic knowledge of Bhangra and the UK scene. Coming on BTF and creating all these threads and making all these statements is giving the members of BTF a false representation of what the UK scene is.

P.S - How Soormay are not on this list is criminal

"Can you imagine the hype and rivalries for a lineup with teams such as,

-NJ
-SPD
-GCC
-AJ
-AEG
-FCB
-BASS
-Furteley Shokeen etc"
First of all I think you may have a misunderstanding of what we agree on. The points that;

- UK teams are now the benchmark for elite Bhangra. You agree with this, I agree with this and I would imagine that the international scene on the whole also agrees with it.

- UK mixers are now mixing for high-tier teams overseas as the concepts/quality of mixes they are making has created a heavy trend. You agree with this, I agree with this and I’m pretty sure the international scene also agrees with the it.

So it’s pretty ironic how I don’t see what the disagreement is as we agree on these basic points.

Moving on to your point about competitions; I made the post from the view point as an audience member who knows more about professional Bhangra than a random person in the community. From what @siddyp eluded to; His post is implying that I may have been slightly right. I’m not a competition organiser so his points are something that needs to be seriously addressed if this is the case as it means a lot of international teams are missing out (who very much want to come over) and share the stage with our UK teams.

Now as you diverted the post onto a more personal level (which a lot of us are really not surprised lmao), I didn’t realise my position in your eyes was that I am a representative of UK Bhangra on BTF and whatever I say is the true representation of actually what is going on here? Lol, I am actually honoured that you think that even though in my eyes I am active on BTF as someone who has been part of the scene since 2013, (even if I don’t actively dance for a team now) I go to all UK competitions as an audience member purely because I love the art. I would like to think that our NA/US friends on this forum are not so gullible to think I’m the UK Bhangra representative. Maybe if more UK dancers used BTF for discussions/criticism/feedbacks rather than private WhatsApp groups to send screenshots in and laugh at fellow dancers and mixers, then maybe there would be a variety of opinion from the UK and not just mine.

Also in the list of teams I mentioned in my original post, you somehow had seemed to ignored the words ‘such as’ and ‘etc’ which (if you weren't so quick to jump the gun), would mean that it’s just a representative list; an example; not a final one. There are a handful of international teams I would like to see in a competition with the top UK teams, but we can’t have all of them now can we?

Right... Coming back to the topic itself; International teams please apply to Bhangra Fest in the future if you can! Alot of us would love to see you dance here.
 

hardeep_singh

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,418
#11
WBBC and Elite 8 never showcased the top talent of the bhangra circuit. For example, Elite 8 invited Empire 2 years in a row despite the fact that their cookie cutter robotic dancing style meant they had no chance at winning the competition. Both competitions showcased some good teams, some over the hill teams, and mediocre college teams; pretty much the standard line up for any competition. So, the only difference between these “elite” competitions and any general competition was the hype. The ONLY competitions which can be considered as elite level are live competitions in Punjab, the reasons being that those competitions aren’t constrained by the economics of international bhangra competitions, and the sole purpose of those competitions is to display and help propagate the presentation of proper Punjabi folk dances. Every other bhangra competition EVER is organized to make money, money must be made to cover all the costs associated with running these competitions. That fancy stage they have at The Bhangra Showdown isn’t free. People have to buy tickets, the general public doesn’t understand bhangra, no amount of marketing will help the general public gain a better understanding of bhangra. A good understanding of bhangra is necessary to be passionate about it, to care enough about it to donate time or money to help it be passed down to the next generation. The lack of understanding or passion leads to bhangra being of just passing interest to the average competition attendee, the have no investment in seeing international teams competing. Economically it’s more valuable to the organizers to have teams which consist of local kids whose families are connected to the community enough that organic interest will result in favorable attendance numbers. Competitions have always been social events, girls go to see guys, guys go to see girls, old people go to see whose kids are doing what, so they can gossip about it for the next 2 weeks, and everyone gets to watch some performances, so they can feel good about having attended a cultural event. If the audience is full the organizers can be happy that they’ve pulled a profit they can funnel to their personal finances/businesses; unless the whole competition is sketchy enough that it may actually have been a complex money laundering operation *cough*idols*cough*.

It's time the World came to the UK. Even some of the non-placing teams at Bhangra Fest this year could give some of the US/AUS teams a run for their money.”
“There's only less than a handful of teams in the US/NA circuit that can go toe-to-toe with some of the UK Elite teams. Everyone watches TBS and BF sets more than sets coming out of the US/AUS scene.” - harind_singh

Ignorance, bravado, and arrogance born of insecurity are not a good mix.

I was sent a link for the GCC Bhangrafest 2018 performance and honestly it was trash. If this is the kind of set that wins UK competitions, the whole evolution of UK bhangra is a complete disappointment. UK started off with shit like “the bhangra heads” then it seems like the entire circuit became obsessed with SGPD and decided that dancing really fast and sloppy was the key to winning competitions. According to the GCC logo, this team is about grace, culture, and creativity; where’s the grace in a performance when everything is done so fast that people are struggling to properly complete moves and hit formations. Move execution is all over the place, dancers are either going all out from the beginning hoping their energy doesn’t run out by the end or dancers are holding back from the beginning because they know their energy will run out by the second half of the set if they don’t. I’m assuming this team displays culture by having a mix made by a high school kid (more on this later). Creativity = adding lots of spins and having an end style segment as a second segment? The mix is so embarrassing they should have just aborted and gone off stage with those behtkaan jandu singha combos at 4:20. I liked the first half of jhoomer but then it was followed up with a crappy second half that makes you completely forget that the first half was entertaining. Jhoomer to daang transition choreo and music are awkward. I liked that GCC experimented with dancing at a different tempo at the beginning of the daang segment, it shows that they understand that slower dancing is possible. Another funny thing about this set is that every time the team holds a formation they exaggerate the hell out of whatever move is being done while they’re holding formation, like “WE’RE NOT RUNNING ACROSS STAGE RIGHT NOW LET’S FLAIL OUR ARMS AS HARD AS WE CAN!!!” I think I see some APD at 7:51, hi @Danny , miss you bro. I also like the slightest little bit of luddi moves added to the set, really is nice knowing that the team is aware that there is more to bhangra than the typical checklist of bhangra segments. Another energy saving trick thoroughly utilized by GCC in this set, only have select number of dancers perform the really hard moves, and vary the dancers doing the hard moves throughout the set to help everyone conserve energy.
The mix GCC danced to is utterly amateur, it’s full of tropes that got played out 8 yrs ago, and the genius mixer decided to throw some racial slurs in as well. This mix is the biggest mistake made by GCC, despite the flaws with their choreo and execution, a team deserves respect for dancing on stage in front of a crowd. But the mix is so horrid that it destroys any sense of respect you may have for this team. Folk dances don’t exist in a vacuum, they are built on the rhythms and sounds they accompany. This team made the conscious decision to perform on stage to a mess of pitch shifted song segments intermixed with random effects and hip hop elements. I could understand and pick out what songs were being danced to, but the mix of music made no sense, no cohesivity whatsoever. GCC would have been better served removing all vocals completely and dancing to a mix made solely of the underlying bass beats. This is the dissonance; how do you expect to be viewed as caring about the culture when you simultaneously don’t care enough to understand the music and try to present a performance as a cohesive combination of Punjabi music and dance.

To everyone in the UK bhangra circuit, learn to stop taking yourselves so seriously, try to understand Punjabi music and Punjabi dance, and understand how to have fun on stage. The NA scene started off being defined by shitty dancing, then transitioned to a state of ego-driven hyper-competitiveness, and now it’s in a competitive decline because audiences are waning everywhere to the point where organizers can’t make the economics work in their favor. I appreciate the Australian scene because ever since it became competitive, it seems like from afar that teams have learned to enjoy themselves and have fun on stage. Nothing in the current NA, UK, Aus scenes really matters though the next generation will determine the course of Punjabi dance. I’m hopeful that bhangra will evolve and progress positively because of the development of academies in north America, places where kids are taught to understand the culture properly by people who have a deep love and respect for the past. These kids won’t be hindered by the flaws and insecurities prevalent in my generation. Maybe one day bhangra competitions will die out and be replaced by raunak melas where teams of kids who learned to dance on live dhol beats perform sets that showcase the beauty of a culture that is slowly fading as it evolves.
 
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Messages
22
#15
WBBC and Elite 8 never showcased the top talent of the bhangra circuit. For example, Elite 8 invited Empire 2 years in a row despite the fact that their cookie cutter robotic dancing style meant they had no chance at winning the competition. Both competitions showcased some good teams, some over the hill teams, and mediocre college teams; pretty much the standard line up for any competition. So, the only difference between these “elite” competitions and any general competition was the hype. The ONLY competitions which can be considered as elite level are live competitions in Punjab, the reasons being that those competitions aren’t constrained by the economics of international bhangra competitions, and the sole purpose of those competitions is to display and help propagate the presentation of proper Punjabi folk dances. Every other bhangra competition EVER is organized to make money, money must be made to cover all the costs associated with running these competitions. That fancy stage they have at The Bhangra Showdown isn’t free. People have to buy tickets, the general public doesn’t understand bhangra, no amount of marketing will help the general public gain a better understanding of bhangra. A good understanding of bhangra is necessary to be passionate about it, to care enough about it to donate time or money to help it be passed down to the next generation. The lack of understanding or passion leads to bhangra being of just passing interest to the average competition attendee, the have no investment in seeing international teams competing. Economically it’s more valuable to the organizers to have teams which consist of local kids whose families are connected to the community enough that organic interest will result in favorable attendance numbers. Competitions have always been social events, girls go to see guys, guys go to see girls, old people go to see whose kids are doing what, so they can gossip about it for the next 2 weeks, and everyone gets to watch some performances, so they can feel good about having attended a cultural event. If the audience is full the organizers can be happy that they’ve pulled a profit they can funnel to their personal finances/businesses; unless the whole competition is sketchy enough that it may actually have been a complex money laundering operation *cough*idols*cough*.

It's time the World came to the UK. Even some of the non-placing teams at Bhangra Fest this year could give some of the US/AUS teams a run for their money.”
“There's only less than a handful of teams in the US/NA circuit that can go toe-to-toe with some of the UK Elite teams. Everyone watches TBS and BF sets more than sets coming out of the US/AUS scene.” - harind_singh

Ignorance, bravado, and arrogance born of insecurity are not a good mix.

I was sent a link for the GCC Bhangrafest 2018 performance and honestly it was trash. If this is the kind of set that wins UK competitions, the whole evolution of UK bhangra is a complete disappointment. UK started off with shit like “the bhangra heads” then it seems like the entire circuit became obsessed with SGPD and decided that dancing really fast and sloppy was the key to winning competitions. According to the GCC logo, this team is about grace, culture, and creativity; where’s the grace in a performance when everything is done so fast that people are struggling to properly complete moves and hit formations. Move execution is all over the place, dancers are either going all out from the beginning hoping their energy doesn’t run out by the end or dancers are holding back from the beginning because they know their energy will run out by the second half of the set if they don’t. I’m assuming this team displays culture by having a mix made by a high school kid (more on this later). Creativity = adding lots of spins and having an end style segment as a second segment? The mix is so embarrassing they should have just aborted and gone off stage with those behtkaan jandu singha combos at 4:20. I liked the first half of jhoomer but then it was followed up with a crappy second half that makes you completely forget that the first half was entertaining. Jhoomer to daang transition choreo and music are awkward. I liked that GCC experimented with dancing at a different tempo at the beginning of the daang segment, it shows that they understand that slower dancing is possible. Another funny thing about this set is that every time the team holds a formation they exaggerate the hell out of whatever move is being done while they’re holding formation, like “WE’RE NOT RUNNING ACROSS STAGE RIGHT NOW LET’S FLAIL OUR ARMS AS HARD AS WE CAN!!!” I think I see some APD at 7:51, hi @Danny , miss you bro. I also like the slightest little bit of luddi moves added to the set, really is nice knowing that the team is aware that there is more to bhangra than the typical checklist of bhangra segments. Another energy saving trick thoroughly utilized by GCC in this set, only have select number of dancers perform the really hard moves, and vary the dancers doing the hard moves throughout the set to help everyone conserve energy.
The mix GCC danced to is utterly amateur, it’s full of tropes that got played out 8 yrs ago, and the genius mixer decided to throw some racial slurs in as well. This mix is the biggest mistake made by GCC, despite the flaws with their choreo and execution, a team deserves respect for dancing on stage in front of a crowd. But the mix is so horrid that it destroys any sense of respect you may have for this team. Folk dances don’t exist in a vacuum, they are built on the rhythms and sounds they accompany. This team made the conscious decision to perform on stage to a mess of pitch shifted song segments intermixed with random effects and hip hop elements. I could understand and pick out what songs were being danced to, but the mix of music made no sense, no cohesivity whatsoever. GCC would have been better served removing all vocals completely and dancing to a mix made solely of the underlying bass beats. This is the dissonance; how do you expect to be viewed as caring about the culture when you simultaneously don’t care enough to understand the music and try to present a performance as a cohesive combination of Punjabi music and dance.

To everyone in the UK bhangra circuit, learn to stop taking yourselves so seriously, try to understand Punjabi music and Punjabi dance, and understand how to have fun on stage. The NA scene started off being defined by shitty dancing, then transitioned to a state of ego-driven hyper-competitiveness, and how it’s in a competitive decline because audiences are waning everywhere to the point where organizers can’t make the economics work in their favor. I appreciate the Australian scene because ever since it became competitive, it seems like from afar that teams have learned to enjoy themselves and have fun on stage. Nothing in the current NA, UK, Aus scenes really matters though the next generation will determine the course of Punjabi dance. I’m hopeful that bhangra will evolve and progress positively because of the development of academies in north America, places where kids are taught to understand the culture properly by people who have a deep love and respect for the past. These kids won’t be hindered by the flaws and insecurities prevalent in my generation. Maybe one day bhangra competitions will die out and be replaced by raunak melas where teams of kids who learned to dance on live dhol beats perform sets that showcase the beauty of a culture that is slowly fading as it evolves.
Never has someone's Disclaimer in their signature been so accurate.

I haven't got time for an essay talking about raunak mele, but I'll 2-2's drop a paragraph.

Putting all that troll business aside, people who are actually active in the scene, running academies, making sets and constantly trying to better the level of bhangra done know that there's nothing wrong with what I said. You can say what you like about the GCC set, it REALLY doesn't make a difference. But what IS the attraction in the US/NA? Even the top tier teams there aren't competing against each other. How many times have we seen NJ,SPD,Soormay in the same line up? But the chance of beating GCC,VP,AJ at BF is a lot more braggin' rights.

I appreciate what SiddyP said and understand the complications with the organisers and the ticket sales is a fair point. But hopefully we see that overcome and see a 100lid lineup in the future in the UK. Tea and biscuits on me!

Also regarding the mix....It bangs so hard doe!

For the rest of y'all trolling guys, Make America Great Again.
 
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Messages
30
#17
Everyone says the NA scene was amazing from 09-12, but in reality it was only the Canadian teams that people watched - NJ, SGPD, NYPD, Shan-E-Punjab and now SPD.

America was only good at hosting competitions and having the Canadians come over and pick up trophies. Now the UK has also been banging the USA scene for the last 4 years.

The truth is, you hillbillies were never at the game.

Feel free to host a competition so we can go at it with the Canadians.

P.S. Make sure the tea is hot. (@hardeep_singh as chaiwala)
 

Howie Magz

Well-Known Member
Messages
417
#18
Everyone says the NA scene was amazing from 09-12, but in reality it was only the Canadian teams that people watched - NJ, SGPD, NYPD, Shan-E-Punjab and now SPD.

America was only good at hosting competitions and having the Canadians come over and pick up trophies. Now the UK has also been banging the USA scene for the last 4 years.

The truth is, you hillbillies were never at the game.

Feel free to host a competition so we can go at it with the Canadians.

P.S. Make sure the tea is hot. (@hardeep_singh as chaiwala)

Lol you wouldn’t know until you came here to compete would you?
 

Saab

Today is a gift
Messages
983
#19
Everyone says the NA scene was amazing from 09-12, but in reality it was only the Canadian teams that people watched - NJ, SGPD, NYPD, Shan-E-Punjab and now SPD.

America was only good at hosting competitions and having the Canadians come over and pick up trophies. Now the UK has also been banging the USA scene for the last 4 years.

The truth is, you hillbillies were never at the game.

Feel free to host a competition so we can go at it with the Canadians.

P.S. Make sure the tea is hot. (@hardeep_singh as chaiwala)
I would completely disagree with this statement. Honestly, if the US scene was just one comp a year mentality, it would probably be a much different story. I can see teams like JJ, BK, AEG, FCB, NSG, etc being completely and utter dominant in a one comp format...similar to UK/Canada teams in the past/present.

In terms of actually competing, iIdeally, I think an alternating year-to-year comp makes sense, where you can build a narrative around the winning and successful teams and actually sell and monetize tickets. I think some cooperation between UK, Australian, and US comps to build this formula out will be beneficial long term.

Also, if you want your tea hot, lets just put all the UK mixes into a microwave and put some hot water and tea bags in there. I think with all the pitch radiation we could keep the tea hot for decades.