*** Wiki Starter Topic 4- Common Bhangra words/phrases***

yraparla

SwizzeeMusic.com
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2,072
Note: Please contribute w/e you can. Even if it's just searching past threads and posting that info here, that's a huge help. Ram (Saab) or I will compile and put the information on the wiki itself. After that people can edit the wiki directly

Let's compile a list of common/important phrases for newbies to learn (let's avoid the curses, those are easy)


ex:

Gabroo
Josh
Sardar
Jhummar
Jodiyan/Jodi
Jatt
Pagh
Khunda/Daang
Saap
Kato
etc etc


Anyone want to ask for word definitions, this is place to do it!
 

voxanimus

<('.'<) (>'.')>
Messages
1,686
for some of the common terms, perhaps we can reference popular songs? like Gabru Gulab Warga, Mutiyaar by Manni Sandhu, etc. etc.


Gabroo - a term for a young adult Punjabi male. Generally accepted to be in the prime of his life.(cf. Gabru Gulab Warga - Jaswinder Daghamia; the title means "rose-like young men")
Mutiyaar - the corresponding term for females. A young adult Punjabi woman. (cf. Mutiyaar feat. Malkit Bulla - Manni Sandhu
Josh - energy, pure and simple. The physical exuberance a dancer puts into his performance. Not to be confused with nakhra.
Nakhra - attitude. In a broader sense, nakhra refers to the individual "swag" put into each move, in the form of affectations, by each dancer. (we definitely should have a video here.)
Sardar (someone else more knowledgeable of Punjabi/Sikh culture can provide a definition for this.)
Jhummar - one of the many traditional dances that was amalgamated into the modern conception of bhangra in the 60s. (others include luddi, sammi, etc.) Jhummar is a slow, expressive dance that emphasizes grace and poise. (here's a video)
Jodiyan/Jodi - pair. bhangra performances traditionally involve the dancers grouped into pairs, usually by vardi (outfit) color. one element of the performance involves these pairs interacting specifically with each other. (here's a video)
Jatt (nope. not doing this one)
Vardi - [SIZE=78%]literally, uniform. the traditional outfit that a bhangra dancer wears for performances. plural vardiyan. [/SIZE][SIZE=78%]vardiyan have many specific components, each of which is different for men and women.[/SIZE]
Parts of a vardi:
  • [SIZE=78%]Chadra - (n.) the bottom half of the garment; sort of resembles a cloth tied around the waist. plural chadre.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Kurta - (n.) the top half of the garment; basically a very long shirt.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Vest - (n.) worn above the kurta.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Paghari - (n.) the male headwear. an ornate type of turban. often called pagh.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Turla - (n.) the turla is the fan-like adornment that rises out of a paghari. A part of the paghari itself.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Phuman - (n.) outfit apparel worn on arms (either around biceps, or above the elbows) and around the wrists. Resemble small balls of yarn.[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Salwar - (n.) the baggy, harem-style pants. (only worn by female dancers)[/SIZE][SIZE=78%].[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=78%]Parandia - (n.) the braid threaded into the dancer’s hair. [/SIZE](only worn by female dancers)
  • [SIZE=78%]Chunni - (n.) the female head covering. a sash draped over the back of her hair. [/SIZE](only worn by female dancers)
  • [SIZE=78%]Kaintha - (n.) a traditional heavy style necklace.[/SIZE]
Khunda/Daang - [SIZE=78%]khunda - (n.) the stick-like prop used by bhangra dancers. plural khunde. [/SIZE][SIZE=78%]alternatively known as a daang, these “sticks” are some of the most commonly used bhangra props, and sections in which they are used are crucial elements of most competitive bhangra performances.[/SIZE]
Saap - [SIZE=78%]saap - n. those criscrossy things that bhangra dancers “click” together, usually in time with the beat, during a routine. [/SIZE][SIZE=78%]also known as shikke and khenchiyan. s[/SIZE][SIZE=78%]ome sources claim that saaps were originally used to scare away crows from crops. others attribute the loud noise created from using the saap as an invocation of thunder clouds.[/SIZE]
Kato - a bhangra instrument or prop designed to mimic the movements of a squirrel. it looks like a capital T made out of wood, with a string coming off each of the arms of the T. each arm has a smaller wooden piece attached to it, and when the strings are pulled, the pieces move upward and clack against the top of the kato.


(here's some more words)


Chimta - [SIZE=78%]the chimta is a thin strip of metal that has been folded in the middle and has many small cymbals attached to either side of it. [/SIZE][SIZE=78%]the word “chimta” in Punjabi literally means “tongs.” this reflects the origin of the instrument in the tools used by Punjabi cooks in the kitchen. the chimta is either played by clapping it together, similar to a castanet, or holding by it in one hand and striking it with the side of the other. [/SIZE][SIZE=78%]often, in bhangra performances, chimte are twirled in time with the music to add flair and style to the routine. in any live bhangra performance, and even in many music performances, the chimta player is an essential part of the act.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=78%]Phumaniyan (maybe we should group all the dance steps into one article?)[/SIZE]

[SIZE=78%]i got nothing else.[/SIZE]
 

nishan

New Member
Messages
211
sangeensingh said:
Jatt: A badass farmer.
This is pretty accurate.


Voxanimus: I agree, words like Jatt and Sardar may cause some controversy, so its best we let someone who is educated in that area handle it. Although I do want to add that being a Sikh Sardar has nothing to do with Bhangra. "Sardar" is known to as one of the highest honors in our society. Unfortunately, Bollywood has created a very wrong image of them and that is how the rest of India views them.


Thoughts?
 

yraparla

SwizzeeMusic.com
Messages
2,072
nishan said:
sangeensingh said:
Jatt: A badass farmer.
This is pretty accurate.


Voxanimus: I agree, words like Jatt and Sardar may cause some controversy, so its best we let someone who is educated in that area handle it. Although I do want to add that being a Sikh Sardar has nothing to do with Bhangra. "Sardar" is known to as one of the highest honors in our society. Unfortunately, Bollywood has created a very wrong image of them and that is how the rest of India views them.


Thoughts?

Controversy is important to discuss for sure. Sardar for instance has nothing to do with Bhangra, but it's important to identify the word and explain. Especially when 90% of the bhangra songs in mixes use the word. Same with Jatt. It's important to identify 'controversial' words and explain their context and use to newbies (which is the whole point of all of this).
 

Bhangraboy234

New Member
Messages
51
Jatt is a punjabi word used to describe farmers/landowners. Some people think that Jatt is part of a caste system, but I like to think of it more of a socio-economic status. Jatts farm for a living, and the term for farmer is Jatt. Other "castes" have their names and that some way corresponds to their profession. ***I am not saying jatts are better than anyone else, just explaining the term as it was explained to me*** Sardar simply put is a turbaned Sikh. Sardar also can be used to refer to a high title, but the defintion I use is a turbaned Sikh. I apologize if I offended anyone in any way.
 

amancheema

Active Member
Messages
240
Bhangraboy234 said:
Jatt is a punjabi word used to describe farmers/landowners. Some people think that Jatt is part of a caste system, but I like to think of it more of a socio-economic status. Jatts farm for a living, and the term for farmer is Jatt. Other "castes" have their names and that some way corresponds to their profession. ***I am not saying jatts are better than anyone else, just explaining the term as it was explained to me*** Sardar simply put is a turbaned Sikh. Sardar also can be used to refer to a high title, but the defintion I use is a turbaned Sikh. I apologize if I offended anyone in any way.

"And Here We Go" - Joker
 

kman58

Active Member
Messages
153
Hey, don't know if I should be bringing this back or starting a new post or not but I'm giving it a try: what are the punjabi versions of common bhangra dance segments/moves? Things I know are:


Betkas - intense squats
Jugni - beat slows down and you move side to side all low
Jhoomer - slow lyrical section, often with jodis


I don't know what Dhamaal means (i can figure the literal definition but not in terms of the dance), if there's anything else people know I'd love to hear it, I want to stop saying "start at the part where you clap and spin" at practice and use the actual word lol. Thank you!
 

J-Skeet

New Member
Messages
252
Sardar- Come from Sirdaar. Ser refers to the head and daar to individual. It's a title of nobility much like lubardaar, zameendaar, jagirdaar, chaudary etc etc. Sirdaar is a title that was and is still used across Turkey through Iran across Central and South Asia. It's really no surprise when you think of the origin of Punjabis and other Indo-Iranic/Aryan cultures. Anyway to cut things much shorter Sirdaar is a title which usually means the holder is the head hancho of his tribe/clan/village/army etc. It's used much more commonly like that today in pakistan where people still hold onto chaudary and Sirdaar as their title. Some Indians use it as a title too, but it's most commonly used now to refer to a Sikh with a pagh. The reason why they refer to Sikhs with a pagh as Sardars is pretty obvs (head holder). Also a Sikh with a pagh is naturally a Sardaar anyway ;)
 

J-Skeet

New Member
Messages
252
Jat- By definition a farmer. I wouldn't say it's a caste at all but more of an ethnic tribe distinct from the other agricultural tribes in Punjab like Lubana, Saini, Kamboj for example. It's a biradari if you understand that. The usage of Jat in songs and mainstream media is due to the stereotypes behind Jats and the sheer percentage of Jats in Punjab (heard reports of as much as 70%). You can look up the stereotypes.
 

voxanimus

<('.'<) (>'.')>
Messages
1,686
kman58 said:
Hey, don't know if I should be bringing this back or starting a new post or not but I'm giving it a try: what are the punjabi versions of common bhangra dance segments/moves? Things I know are:


Betkas - intense squats
Jugni - beat slows down and you move side to side all low
Jhoomer - slow lyrical section, often with jodis


I don't know what Dhamaal means (i can figure the literal definition but not in terms of the dance), if there's anything else people know I'd love to hear it, I want to stop saying "start at the part where you clap and spin" at practice and use the actual word lol. Thank you!

http://bhangrateamsforum.com/discuss/main-bhangra-discussion/list-of-bhangra-moves/


http://bhangrateamsforum.com/discuss/post-mixes-and-video-links/sickkkkkk/msg2365/#msg2365


a lot of this nomenclature is really non-standard, and everything has at least two names, but this should be a good start.
 

nmistry2

New Member
Messages
84
sher - a poem generally recited at the start of a performance usually talks about culture the team and the dance form they are performing


boliyan - like a sher but instead of reciting a poem it is a small snippet of a song that is sung at the start of the performance.


jodi - refers to your partner on stage, the person you interact with and dance with


lalkare - refers to phrases said on stage like "HOI" "aaa haa" "brrrruuuuaaaahhhh" etc


mode - moving your shoulders up and down but it should be controlled it comes from the shoulders not from forcing the arms up and down


mela - a segment where everyone stage does something different and goes crazy
 

faizan

Just shut up and dance
Messages
1,738
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?
 

voxanimus

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1,686
faizan said:
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?

the ones on the wiki are pretty correct. Harkiran did them.
 

J-Skeet

New Member
Messages
252
voxanimus said:
faizan said:
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?

the ones on the wiki are pretty correct. Harkiran did them.
I can't see the wiki?? Also i don't think there's any way to get these definitions verified. Not sure how we could verify if someone is an expert or not
 

GSingh

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,435
J-Skeet said:
voxanimus said:
faizan said:
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?

the ones on the wiki are pretty correct. Harkiran did them.
I can't see the wiki?? Also i don't think there's any way to get these definitions verified. Not sure how we could verify if someone is an expert or not

I don't think the problem is accuracy, but rather thoroughness. While most of the definitions aren't 'wrong' they don't paint the complete picture.


For example, not to pick on the person but a "mela" isn't in its entirety a segment in which people do random things and goes crazy. It's the punjabi equivalent of a carnival/festival/fair. The word is also used metaphorically when there's a large gathering of people as a reference to the type of gathering that occurs at said carnival/festival/fair eg. "Ethe tan mela laggya peya".


The Bhangra segment, logically, plays out in a sense that there are many things to do at a festival with lots if people doing various activities, enjoying themselves. That translates on stage to the dancers doing different moves exuberantly.


Agreed on the expertise comment above though. There's really no way on this forum to verify expertise easily so the best course of action is to simply take the information with a grain of salt and use it as a guideline, not as a specific definition.


nmistry2 said:
mode - moving your shoulders up and down but it should be controlled it comes from the shoulders not from forcing the arms up and down


Sorry to pick on you again. Modhey just means "shoulders". How you move them is all up to you haha, nothing about how to dance with them in the word. Probably the closest succint phrase that you meant to describe was "modhey hilaune" or "the movement of the shoulders".
 

Saleem

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Messages
1,919
J-Skeet said:
voxanimus said:
faizan said:
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?

the ones on the wiki are pretty correct. Harkiran did them.
I can't see the wiki?? Also i don't think there's any way to get these definitions verified. Not sure how we could verify if someone is an expert or not
After many months of trying to get people to contribute to the wiki, it died a slow death. But to answer Faizan's question, when you were logged into BTF you were automatically logged into the BTF wiki http://bhangrateamsforum.com/bwiki/ , and could edit any of the wiki articles. As for 'expertise', just as in this thread it seems a baseline is entered, then someone with a bit more knowledge comes along and adds their input. Same as in a wiki.

Unfortunately, http://bhangrateamsforum.com/bwiki/ currently throws an error because the forum has been through several upgrades since the wiki was last promoted/used. If there's interest in maintaining the wiki now, we could always look to fix it but at this time I see it as a feature to be deprecated due to disuse.
 

nmistry2

New Member
Messages
84
GSingh said:
J-Skeet said:
voxanimus said:
faizan said:
Most of the above definitions are inaccurate and/or wrong. Shouldn't there be some process for verifying these definitions by experts?

the ones on the wiki are pretty correct. Harkiran did them.
I can't see the wiki?? Also i don't think there's any way to get these definitions verified. Not sure how we could verify if someone is an expert or not

I don't think the problem is accuracy, but rather thoroughness. While most of the definitions aren't 'wrong' they don't paint the complete picture.


For example, not to pick on the person but a "mela" isn't in its entirety a segment in which people do random things and goes crazy. It's the punjabi equivalent of a carnival/festival/fair. The word is also used metaphorically when there's a large gathering of people as a reference to the type of gathering that occurs at said carnival/festival/fair eg. "Ethe tan mela laggya peya".


The Bhangra segment, logically, plays out in a sense that there are many things to do at a festival with lots if people doing various activities, enjoying themselves. That translates on stage to the dancers doing different moves exuberantly.


Agreed on the expertise comment above though. There's really no way on this forum to verify expertise easily so the best course of action is to simply take the information with a grain of salt and use it as a guideline, not as a specific definition.


nmistry2 said:
mode - moving your shoulders up and down but it should be controlled it comes from the shoulders not from forcing the arms up and down


Sorry to pick on you again. Modhey just means "shoulders". How you move them is all up to you haha, nothing about how to dance with them in the word. Probably the closest succint phrase that you meant to describe was "modhey hilaune" or "the movement of the shoulders".

not picking on me your just teaching, these are the ways i was taught them. I guess i do not know the literal translation and how to use the words at all times but at least you helped
 
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